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Midnight Riders Cross The Border
Previously-unreleased, magnificent Channel One, with the Gladiators band backing the Riders' best Black Uhuru impressions.




The Hax Nah Fatten No Roach Fe Fowl
Limber bubblers, with some nice, moody vibes-playing, and chewy reasoning from Carlton Lafters, in a Tenor Saw style and fashion.






Jah I Maz Freedom Is A Must
A Bullwackies masterpiece haunted, reeling roots, saturated in hurt, confusion and resistance, with a knockout Baba Leslie-led dub announcing Digikiller's mouth-watering new tranche of reissues from the studio....



Joe Axumite No Equal Rights In Babylon
Super-tough, odd, scrubby sufferers with some terrific, knackered piano and quaintly acquiescent lyrics. Giddily cavernous dub. Killer Wackies.



Wayne Jarrett Come Let's Go
Ace, loose, mystical roots, with sick synths, slacky tidy guitar, and Jarrett pouring himself into the mic. With a thumping dub led by saxophonist Jerry Johnson.



Don Carlos Black Harmony
Recording as Jah Carlos in 1976. Massive, glorious Soul Syndicate rhythm, with blazing horns, soulful reasoning, tremendous dub. Another great record.



Deadly Headley And Asher Drums Of The Arab
Killer Cry Tuff melodica lick of Drum Song.



The Invaders Conquering Lion
The legendary Coxsone Sound dubplate a gorgeous close-harmony roots enchanter voiced and mixed by King Tubby for Prince Jazzbo's Ujama imprint. Bim!



The Invaders Heaven And Earth
The Greenwich Farm and Trenchtown youth return ineffably to the Conquering Lion rhythm for their own label, with a much fuller sound than the Ujamas. Fab.



Naggo Morris Bootlegger
The Heptone on a rocking melodica version of Conquering Lion.



Jennifer Lara Music By The Score
The queen of JA Lovers on a tough version of Rockfort Rock, supervised in the late-seventies by Prince Far I.