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Black Ace
Babe Kyro Lemon Turner's wonderful Texan take on Hawaiian steel — impassioned, singing, refined. From 1960 — though he started out in the late-twenties (with Smokey Hogg), and recorded in the thirties.



Big Joe Williams Tough Times
Stunning Delta blues, right in your face, slurred and shouted, bashed and beaten from a homemade nine-string.



Lightnin' Hopkins Texas Blues Man
Inimitable blues meditations, from 1968, with some boogie for good measure.







Blind Blake That Lonesome Rave
One of the very greatest blues guitarists of all time. These sides are from the Paramount Studios in Chicago, May 1928, featuring singer Bertha Henderson (also Daniel Brown and Elzadie Robinson).



Blind Blake The Vanished Bluesman In Richmond
Lovely recordings from the Gennett Studios in Indiana, several with accompaniments by the great, great barrelhouse pianist Charlie Spand, from Detroit. With all-time classics like Hastings Street.



Blind Willie McTell Searching The Desert For The Blues
Okehs (as Georgia Bill), Victors (Hot Shot Willie) and Vocalions (Blind Willie) — with another amazing Georgia blues guitarist, Curley Weaver, and two fine Atlanta singers, Ruth Willis and Ruby Glaze.



Blind Willie McTell Amazing Grace
John Lomax was on a Library of Congress field trip in 1940 when he saw McTell busking in the car-park of the Atlanta Pig ‘n Whistle BBQ. The great man got a buck for this session. (Check the monologues).



Blind Willie McTell East St.Louis
Rare cuts for Regal Records in Atlanta in 1950, also featuring guitarist Curley Williams. This is the first time that many of these tracks have ever been issued on vinyl.



Blind Willie McTell Fare You Well
Recorded for Vocalion (in New York City) and Decca (in Chicago) these tracks from the mid-thirties mark the height of McTell’s recording career. That's his wife Kate singing on Ain’t It Grand To Be A Christian.



Robert Pete Williams Free Again
Recorded in Baton Rouge in 1960, when Williams was on parole, out of Angola prison, labouring eighty hours a week on a work-farm.



Robert Pete Williams Louisiana Blues
'It's difficult to approve the banalities of most blues singers after listening to Robert Pete Williams,' writes Guralnick in Feel Like Going Home. From 1966, originally on Fahey's Takoma imprint. 180g LP.