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Laurie Spiegel The Expanding Universe
Classic 1980 electronica: pioneering, live interaction with computer-based logic. The four original album tracks, plus fifteen nearly all new out. Succinct, lucid Minimalism, citing Bach and Fahey as influences.



Laurie Spiegel Unseen Worlds
Late-eighties works re-released by Spiegel's own label, after the demise of the original imprint Scarlet Records.



Sam Spence Sam Spence Sounds
Synth japes from the Krautrock milieu, with an eye on commerce. Spence was born in San Francisco in 1927. He studied under Poulenc in Paris. By the late sixties he was in Germany with one of its first Moogs.




Carl Stone Woo Lae Oak
His debut, originally released on Joan La Barbara's Wizard Records in 1983 a shimmering, beautiful 54 minute tape piece based around minimal samples of strings and wind.



Studio G The Spacey Folk Electro-Horror Sounds Of The Studio G Library
First retrospective of John Gale's library music label (run for two decades from the late sixties on), featuring various startling cues, and some brilliant excerpts from the original Electronic Age LP.




Supernatural Hot Rug And Not Used Supernatural Hot Rug And Not Used
One electric guitar, one sort-of-bass, preamps, amplifiers, microphones, one big room overlooking Osaka in 2005.



Susanna List Of Lights And Buoys
Her debut, with Jolene finally on vinyl.




Dub Taylor Lumiere
Classic concrete, from 1972 truly outstanding mixing live three years' worth of samples on multiple reel-to-reels, together with the new-out ARP 2600.




The Tomorrow People Original Television Music
Previously unreleased electronic music spun out of the Radiophonic Workshop by Delia Derbyshire, Dudley Simpson, Brian Hodgson and David Vorhaus; and caned by the Thames TV children's series between 1973 and 1979.



Tim Olive The Specialist
Live recordings of his homemade guitar, a piece of wood with two magnetic pickups, a couple of bass strings, an unwound guitar string texture and implied pulse rather than tonality and metrical rhythm.